United States Navy and Marine Corps Bases Domestic

"[An] excellent source of detailed information about both famous and obscure places in U.S. naval history." Reference Books Bulletin

United States Navy and Marine Corps Bases  Domestic

"[An] excellent source of detailed information about both famous and obscure places in U.S. naval history." Reference Books Bulletin

More Books:

United States Navy and Marine Corps Bases, Domestic
Language: en
Pages: 740
Authors: Paolo Enrico Coletta
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1985 - Publisher: Greenwood

"[An] excellent source of detailed information about both famous and obscure places in U.S. naval history." Reference Books Bulletin
United States Navy and Marine Corps Bases, Overseas
Language: en
Pages: 459
Authors: Paolo Enrico Coletta
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1985 - Publisher: Greenwood

"These dictionaries are indispensable reference volumes for all students of Naval and Marine Corps history." Aerospace Historian
United States Naval History
Language: en
Pages: 173
Authors: Barbara A. Lynch, John E. Vajda
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher: Naval Historical Center

Books about United States Naval History
Domestic United States Military Facilities of the First World War 1917-1919
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Robert Swanson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-02 - Publisher:

This book attempts to list every place in the United States and Territories where soldiers, sailors, or marines might have been stationed during the First World War. The reason for such a list is to provide source locations and checklists for postal history (letters and cards) from these military men.
A Rocky Mountain Sailor In Teddy Roosevelt's Navy
Language: en
Pages: 430
Authors: Rodney G. Tomlinson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-13 - Publisher: Routledge

An avid reader of naval history since my father's service in World War II, I had been struck by the marked contrast between the touching personal depictions of WW II photo-journalism and the dearth of portrayals of sailors as persons, not just undefined elements of crews. Frederick Harrod would observe,