The Second Epistle to the Corinthians

This verb and this noun typically go together elsewhere in the NT (John 7:39; 14:17; 20:22; Acts 2:38; 8:15–17; 10:47; 19:2). ... (Luke 8:13; Acts 17:11; 1 Thess 1:6; Jas 1:21) and with “the word of God” (Acts 8:14; 11:1; 1 Thess 2:13).

The Second Epistle to the Corinthians

This statement reflects the underlying purpose of The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Begun in the late 1940s by an international team of New Testament scholars, the NICNT series has become recognized by pastors, students, and scholars alike as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition. While based on a thorough study of the Greek text, the commentary introductions and expositions contain a minimum of Greek references. The NICNT authors evaluate significant textual problems and take into account the most important exegetical literature. More technical aspects — such as grammatical, textual, and historical problems — are dealt with in footnotes, special notes, and appendixes. Under the general editorship of three outstanding New Testament scholars — first Ned Stonehouse (Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia), then F. F. Bruce (University of Manchester, England), and now Gordon D. Fee (Regent College, Vancouver, British Columbia) — the NICNT series has continued to develop over the years. In order to keep the commentary “new” and conversant with contemporary scholarship, the NICNT volumes have been — and will be — revised or replaced as necessary. The newer NICNT volumes in particular take into account the role of recent rhetorical and sociological inquiry in elucidating the meaning of the text, and they also exhibit concern for the theology and application of the text. As the NICNT series is ever brought up to date, it will continue to find ongoing usefulness as an established guide to the New Testament text.

More Books:

The Second Epistle to the Corinthians
Language: en
Pages: 692
Authors: Paul Barnett
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-04-17 - Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

This statement reflects the underlying purpose of The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Begun in the late 1940s by an international team of New Testament scholars, the NICNT series has become recognized by pastors, students, and scholars alike as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical
The Second Epistle to the Corinthians
Language: en
Pages: 544
Authors: Margaret Thrall
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher: T&T Clark

The keenly awaited second volume completing this major commentary on 2 Corinthians. Volume II covers chapters 8-13. Dr Thrall provides an exegetical verse-by-verse exposition and addresses all historical, linguistic and theological issues. This volume also contains two concluding essays, on the nature of the opposition Paul faced in the Corinthian
The Second Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: Colin G. Kruse
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 1987 - Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

Tydale New Testament Commenteries contains the Epistle of 2 Corinthians and also book 8.
Font of Pardon and New Life
Language: en
Pages: 284
Authors: Lyle D. Bierma
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

"This book is a study of the historical development and impact of John Calvin's doctrine of baptismal efficacy. The primary questions it addresses are (1) whether Calvin taught an "instrumental" doctrine of baptism, according to which the external sign of the sacrament serves as a means or instrument to convey
The Second Letter to the Corinthians
Language: en
Pages: 569
Authors: Mark A. Seifrid
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-11-09 - Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

The question that Paul set before the ancient church in Corinth -- Do you not recognize that Jesus Christ is in and among you? (2 Cor 13:5) -- remains a critical question for the church today. This commentary by Mark Seifrid seeks to hear Paul s message afresh and communicate