Sweet Taste of Liberty

Later, as she was looking back upon her eventful life, she would even describe her few years in antebellum Ohio as a “sweet taste of liberty,” as if freedom could only be sampled in sips. By 1869, a few years after she had tasted ...

Sweet Taste of Liberty

The unforgettable saga of one enslaved woman's fight for justice--and reparations Born into slavery, Henrietta Wood was taken to Cincinnati and legally freed in 1848. In 1853, a Kentucky deputy sheriff named Zebulon Ward colluded with Wood's employer, abducted her, and sold her back into bondage. She remained enslaved throughout the Civil War, giving birth to a son in Mississippi and never forgetting who had put her in this position. By 1869, Wood had obtained her freedom for a second time and returned to Cincinnati, where she sued Ward for damages in 1870. Astonishingly, after eight years of litigation, Wood won her case: in 1878, a Federal jury awarded her $2,500. The decision stuck on appeal. More important than the amount, though the largest ever awarded by an American court in restitution for slavery, was the fact that any money was awarded at all. By the time the case was decided, Ward had become a wealthy businessman and a pioneer of convict leasing in the South. Wood's son later became a prominent Chicago lawyer, and she went on to live until 1912. McDaniel's book is an epic tale of a black woman who survived slavery twice and who achieved more than merely a moral victory over one of her oppressors. Above all, Sweet Taste of Liberty is a portrait of an extraordinary individual as well as a searing reminder of the lessons of her story, which establish beyond question the connections between slavery and the prison system that rose in its place.

More Books:

Acquired Tastes
Language: en
Pages: 292
Authors: Brenda L. Beagan, Gwen E. Chapman, Josée Johnston, Deborah McPhail, Elaine M. Power, Helen Vallianatos
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-11-15 - Publisher: UBC Press

Magazine articles and self-improvement books tell us that our food choices serve as bold statements about who we are as individuals. Acquired Tastes reveals that they say more about where we come from and who we would like to be. Interviews with Canadian families in both rural and urban settings
The Cultural Politics of Food, Taste, and Identity
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Steffan Igor Ayora-Diaz
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-08 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

The Cultural Politics of Food, Taste, and Identity examines the social, cultural, and political processes that shape the experience of taste. The book positions flavor as involving all the senses, and describes the multiple ways in which taste becomes tied to local, translocal, glocal, and cosmopolitan politics of identity. Global
Making Sense of Taste
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Carolyn Korsmeyer
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-01-17 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

Taste, perhaps the most intimate of the five senses, has traditionally been considered beneath the concern of philosophy, too bound to the body, too personal and idiosyncratic. Yet, in addition to providing physical pleasure, eating and drinking bear symbolic and aesthetic value in human experience, and they continually inspire writers
Sweet Taste of Liberty
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: W. Caleb McDaniel
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-08-07 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

The unforgettable saga of one enslaved woman's fight for justice--and reparations Born into slavery, Henrietta Wood was taken to Cincinnati and legally freed in 1848. In 1853, a Kentucky deputy sheriff named Zebulon Ward colluded with Wood's employer, abducted her, and sold her back into bondage. She remained enslaved throughout
Protestantism and Catholicity Compared in Their Effects on the Civilization of Europe
Language: en
Pages: 501
Authors: Jaime Luciano Balmes
Categories: Europe
Type: BOOK - Published: 1851 - Publisher:

Books about Protestantism and Catholicity Compared in Their Effects on the Civilization of Europe