Summary of Why Nations Fail

By contrast, in Mexico, Spanish conquerors established extractive institutions that were intended to... PLEASE NOTE: This is key takeaways and analysis of the book and NOT the original book.

Summary of Why Nations Fail

Summary of Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson Includes Analysis Preview: Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty is an examination of the causes of economic inequality. Authors Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson conclude that underdevelopment is caused by political institutions and not by geography, climate, or other cultural factors. Elites in underdeveloped countries deliberately plunder their people and keep them impoverished. The city of Nogales is half in Mexico and half in the United States. People in Nogales on the US side of the border are well-educated, prosperous, and have long life expectancies. Those on the Mexican side are poor, poorly educated, and have shorter life expectancies. The differences in Nogales can't be explained by geography or culture. Instead, different governments cause the differences in development. The United States historically established pluralist institutions that encouraged technological innovation and spread wealth throughout the population. By contrast, in Mexico, Spanish conquerors established extractive institutions that were intended to... PLEASE NOTE: This is key takeaways and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread Summary of Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson Includes Analysis Overview of the Book Important People Key Takeaways Analysis of Key Takeaways About the Author With Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience. Visit our website at instaread.co.

More Books:

Summary of Why Nations Fail
Language: en
Pages: 30
Authors: Instaread Summaries
Categories: Study Aids
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-09-22 - Publisher: Idreambooks

Summary of Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson Includes Analysis Preview: Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty is an examination of the causes of economic inequality. Authors Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson conclude that underdevelopment is caused by political institutions and
Why Nations Fail
Language: en
Pages: 54
Authors: Summary Station
Categories: Study Aids
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-11-05 - Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Learn About The History Of Nations In A Fraction Of The Time It Takes To Read The Actual Book!!! Get this 1# Amazon bestseller for just $2.99. Regularly priced at $9.99. Read on your PC, Mac, smart phone, tablet or Kindle device Acemoglu's theory and explanation of the differences in
Summary of Why Nations Fail
Language: en
Pages: 40
Authors: Instaread
Categories: Study Aids
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-09-25 - Publisher: Instaread

Books about Summary of Why Nations Fail
SUMMARY - Why Nations Fail: The Origins Of Power, Prosperity, And Poverty By Daron Acemoglu And James A. Robinson
Language: en
Pages: 35
Authors: Shortcut Edition
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-05 - Publisher: Shortcut Edition

* Our summary is short, simple and pragmatic. It allows you to have the essential ideas of a big book in less than 30 minutes. As you read this summary, you will learn why the presence or absence of certain political and economic institutions encourage or retard progress toward prosperity.
Why Nations Fail
Language: en
Pages: 529
Authors: Daron Acemoglu, James A. Robinson
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Profile Books(GB)

Shortlisted for the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award 2012.Why are some nations more prosperous than others? Why Nations Fail sets out to answer this question, with a compelling and elegantly argued new theory: that it is not down to climate, geography or culture, but