Private Prisons

Offers information on private prisons, provided by Charles H. Logan.

Private Prisons

American prisons and jails are overflowing with inmates. To relieve the pressure, courts have imposed fines on overcrowded facilities and fiscally strapped governments have been forced to release numerous prisoners prematurely. In this study, noted criminologist Charles Logan makes the case for commercial operation of prisons and jails as an alternative to the government's monopoly. On philosophical, economic, legal, and practical grounds, Logan argues a compelling case for the private and commercial operation of prisons. He critically examines all objections raised by opponents, and concludes that while private prisons face many potential problems, they do so primarily because they are prisons, not because they are private. Historically, the record of private ownership and operation of corrections facilities has been bleak--ridden with political corruption, physical abuse of prisoners, and the single-minded pursuit of profits. This study demonstrates that this need not be the case. Critiquing the tendency to contrast private prisons with a hypothetical ideal, Logan instead compares them with existing public institutions, arguing that the potential problems attributed to private prisons are experienced by their public counterparts. The work examines ten sets of issues, including the propriety, cost, security, and quantity of prisons, to set out a strong case for the viability of proprietary prisons.

More Books:

Private Prisons
Language: en
Pages: 318
Authors: Charles H. Logan
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

American prisons and jails are overflowing with inmates. To relieve the pressure, courts have imposed fines on overcrowded facilities and fiscally strapped governments have been forced to release numerous prisoners prematurely. In this study, noted criminologist Charles Logan makes the case for commercial operation of prisons and jails as an
The History and Politics of Private Prisons
Language: en
Pages: 133
Authors: Martin P. Sellers
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

The privatization movement is very important to public and private managers alike. Although the Reagan and Bush administrations' policy suggestions for prison overcrowding have been limited, a consistent theme has been that states and local governments should overcome the corrections crises through the use of privatization techniques, one of which
Private Prisons in America
Language: en
Pages: 188
Authors: Michael A. Hallett
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

Under the auspices of a governmentally sanctioned war on drugs, incarceration rates in the United States have risen dramatically since 1980. Increasingly, correctional administrators at all levels are turning to private, for-profit corporations to manage the swelling inmate population. Policy discussions of this trend toward prison privatization tend to focus
Inside Private Prisons
Language: en
Pages: 321
Authors: Lauren-Brooke Eisen
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-11-07 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

When the tough-on-crime politics of the 1980s overcrowded state prisons, private companies saw potential profit in building and operating correctional facilities. Today more than a hundred thousand of the 1.5 million incarcerated Americans are held in private prisons in twenty-nine states and federal corrections. Private prisons are criticized for making
Private Prisons
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Charles H. Logan
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990-07-26 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

American prisons and jails are overflowing with inmates. To relieve the pressure, courts have imposed fines on overcrowded facilities and fiscally strapped governments have been forced to release numerous prisoners prematurely. In this study, noted criminologist Charles Logan makes the case for commercial operation of prisons and jails as an