New and Developing Sources of Food Proteins

1 INTRODUCTION While soybean and wheat products have a commanding lead as protein-rich supplements in processed foods, several new sources of vegetable protein are potentially able to share the market as food ingredients.

New and Developing Sources of Food Proteins

The recent series of texts 'Developments in Food Proteins' comprised in all seven volumes which were published in the course of the decade 1982-1991. Each volume contained inter alia one or more chapters that were concerned with new or developing sources of food proteins. Most of these have now been collected together in an up dated and re-evaluated form for the present volume. 'New' sources of food proteins includes those sources that are unconventional, that are still of very limited significance in market terms, or that are at present of very localized use. Several of these were included in 'Developments in Food Proteins'. One of them, algae, appeared both in Volume 1 and in an up-dated form in Volume 7. It is therefore not included here. Others, such as yeasts and bacteria, have not yet increased in practical importance as potential food components beyond the long-term promise already evident at that time. However, leaf protein, as described in the present Chapter 10, has moved from the original rather crude concept to a much more sophisticated product in the form of Rubisco. Fungal protein, as Quorn (Chapter 11), has also proved to be potentially of real food value. 'Developing' sources of food protein are those sources that have always been basic items in human diets.

More Books:

New and Developing Sources of Food Proteins
Language: en
Pages: 369
Authors: B.J.F. Hudson
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-12-06 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

The recent series of texts 'Developments in Food Proteins' comprised in all seven volumes which were published in the course of the decade 1982-1991. Each volume contained inter alia one or more chapters that were concerned with new or developing sources of food proteins. Most of these have now been
Chemical and Functional Properties of Food Proteins
Language: en
Pages: 504
Authors: Zdzislaw E. Sikorski
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001-06-22 - Publisher: CRC Press

Chemical and Functional Properties of Food Proteins presents the current state of knowledge on the content of proteins in food structures, the chemical, functional, and nutritive properties of food proteins, the chemical and biochemical modification of proteins in foods during storage and processing, and the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of nitr
Handbook of Food Proteins
Language: en
Pages: 464
Authors: Glyn O. Phillips, P A Williams
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-09-09 - Publisher: Elsevier

Traditionally a source of nutrition, proteins are also added to foods for their ability to form gels and stabilise emulsions, among other properties. The range of specialised protein ingredients used in foods is increasing. Handbook of food proteins provides an authoritative overview of the characteristics, functionalities and applications of different
Food Analysis by HPLC, Second Edition
Language: en
Pages: 1068
Authors: Leo M.L. Nollet
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-04-05 - Publisher: CRC Press

Food Analysis by HPLC, Second Edition presents an exhaustive compilation of analytical methods that belong in the toolbox of every practicing food chemist. Topics covered include biosensors, BMO’s, nanoscale analysis systems, food authenticity, radionuclides concentration, meat factors and meat quality, particle size analysis, and scanning colorimity. It also analyzes peptides,
Applied Food Protein Chemistry
Language: en
Pages: 528
Authors: Zeynep Ustunol
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-12-31 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Food proteins are of great interest, not only because of their nutritional importance and their functionality in foods, but also for their detrimental effects. Although proteins from milk, meats (including fish and poultry), eggs, cereals, legumes, and oilseeds have been the traditional sources of protein in the human diet, potentially