God Bless America

But “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition” was Loesser's entree into the world of full-fledged songwriters. He took the story of the chaplain and, using military slang, put together the first really big hit song to deal directly with ...

God Bless America

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song -- an "Over There" for World War II. The most popular songs, however, continued to be romantic ballads, escapist tunes, or novelty songs. To remedy the situation, the federal government created the National Wartime Music Committee, an advisory group of the Office of War Information (OWI), which outlined "proper" war songs, along with tips on how and what to write. The music business also formed its own Music War Committee to promote war songs. Neither group succeeded. The OWI hoped that Tin Pan Alley could be converted from manufacturing love songs to manufacturing war songs just as automobile plants had retooled to assemble planes and tanks. But the OWI failed to comprehend the large extent by which the war effort would be defined by advertisers and merchandisers. Selling merchandise was the first priority of Tin Pan Alley, and the OWI never swayed them from this course. Kathleen E.R. Smith concludes the government's fears of faltering morale did not materialize. Americans did not need such war songs as "Goodbye, Mama, I'm Off To Yokohama", "There Are No Wings On a Foxhole", or even "The Sun Will Soon Be Setting On The Land Of The Rising Sun" to convince them to support the war. The crusade for a "proper" war song was misguided from the beginning, and the music business, then and now, continues to make huge profits selling love -- not war -- songs.

More Books:

God Bless America
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Kathleen E.R. Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-10-17 - Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song -- an "Over There" for World War II. The most popular songs, however, continued to be romantic ballads, escapist tunes, or novelty songs. To remedy the situation, the federal government created the National Wartime Music
God Bless America
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Sheryl Kaskowitz
Categories: Music
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-11 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

"God Bless America" is a song most Americans know well. It is taught in American schools and regularly performed at sporting events. After the attacks on September 11th, it was sung on the steps of the Capitol, at spontaneous memorial sites, and during the seventh inning stretch at baseball games,
God Bless America
Language: en
Pages: 366
Authors: Dean Coddington
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-08-01 - Publisher: iUniverse

"Carefully reviewing events from 1500 AD to 1830 AD, Coddington and Chapman provide a persuasive list of examples of how they believe God favorably intervened in the establishment of the United States. Regardless of whether you agree or disagree with their arguments, you will be amazed at the number of
God Bless America
Language: en
Pages: 162
Authors: Carlos Zamorano
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-07-27 - Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional to how they perceive veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by our nation. - George Washington
God Bless America
Language: en
Pages: 564
Authors: Robert Hendrickson
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-07-01 - Publisher: Skyhorse

The Queen’s English has no place across the pond, where a long history of defiance, creativity, and originality has made its way into the everyday vocabulary of Americans coast-to-coast. God Bless America is an informative and entertaining guide to the meaning and history beneath our uniquely American words and phrases.